Friday, November 25, 2011

naturalized phenomenology of the developmental interest



This is section 4, the ending, of “biomindality.” It’s possibly the most portentious (pretentious?) thing I’ve ever written.



Thursday, November 24, 2011

after speaking for trillions of communicating, evolving microbes...



...Lynn Margulis dies.

“Dr. Margulis was also known, somewhat controversially, as a collaborator with and supporter of James E. Lovelock, whose Gaia theory states that Earth itself — its atmosphere, the geology and the organisms that inhabit it — is a self-regulating system, maintaining the conditions that allow its perpetuation. In other words, it is something of a living organism in and of itself.”

Genesis of self-regulativity—> quorum sensing—> symbiogenesis—> autopoiesis—> autogeny —> self formativity constitutes the intelligence of Earth.



Sunday, November 20, 2011

on the road (with unnamed partners)



Elations of solitude go where they are carried.

I thought last week that I’d quickly finish my synoptic about a biogenic mode of thinking about “mind,” but I didn’t feel like returning to the task yesterday, because I so wanted to move on (though I didn’t). After weekly shopping and other chores, I saw a good movie, hung out in Moe’s, prattled at home. (You want to know.) 


Monday, November 07, 2011

Sunday, November 06, 2011

message to the world



After I left “Sarah’s Key” early Saturday evening, I walked to Moe’s Books and spent several hours amusing myself. I left very expensively amused, but what the hell: adding to a truly great library is like adding new kinds of plants to a great garden: Gravity’s appeal leads to more gravity. It’s natural. A congregation of importances composes an appellant cohering. Valuingbooks, in my case—flows into a telic cohering of more and more mindedness (or mindality). It’s human.

Let there be as much gardening of importances as we can really afford (and blogs to that effect not left to sleep).

Saturday, November 05, 2011

about fictionally surviving the Holocaust



The key of “Sarah’s Key” is not the closet key that Sarah holds (which betrays her), but her character driving her to survive. The story is about Sarah’s key to surviving, in two senses: Firstly, her attachment to her brother that drives her escape from the Nazi camp before she’s shipped off to where her cohorts would be killed. This is a self-determination typical of persons who survived the Nazi camps. Afterward, she lives for many years fruitfully due to her self determination. The essentially human response to bearing witness to incomprehensible horror is to exemplify life—to go on well, partly in honor of those who were denied the chance, but essentially as expression of our ownmost participation in humanity, not as point in a living mass, but exactly the opposite: as singular gift of our nature, singular example of human potential, which might be the Simple Meaning of It All for us: that we are fruitful potentials able to thrive in love with life.