Sunday, January 20, 2008

minding "the" future good of humanity?


It was never possible for a singular agency to have its substantial sense of "the" good of humanity to implement "for" all humanity, though religions have presumed otherwise, authoritarianisms struggled to hold sway, and some people still theorize world government beyond the U.N.-WTO-intercontinental dance that humanity is evolving.

But a formal pragmatic importance of the theme may be warranted, because the open futurity of human flourishing is facilitated in the prospective appeal of singular telos.

The horizon is never reached, but the fun trip can be wholly transforming.

Saturday, January 19, 2008

toward that sense of mind


I got sidetracked this morning from trying to derive an accessible and short complement to that "sense of humanity" that, earlier this week, promised to have a complement.

That sense of mind wouldn't be about quasi-mystically providing some resoluteness about "Mind," but rather providing a sense of holism about the topic—the contemporary industry, from pop culture about "mind" in "the universe" (that inherits religious cosmopoetics) through flourishing research on evolution of intelligence—as further preface to a long trek through some recent scholarly work in search of a 21stC sense of what philosophy faces and may do, going forward.

Monday, January 14, 2008

a sense of humanity


The “circumspective approach” in mind last Friday is a slow-growing blog I haven’t yet confessed to, called “humanistic union.” So, now I confess, and I’ll note here occasional new postings there.

Maybe a conception of humanity is implicit in the term ‘humanity’. It’s a starting point worth appreciating, I think.

The developing sense of humanistic union isn't simply idealistic. I have in mind a pragmatic approach to political ethics that relies on historical legacy and an analytic sense of humanitarian care. I find the warrant of human rights in our nature, though I don’t expect that odd posting to seem prima facie tenable. However, the view isn’t improvised. It expresses commitment to some terms and grammatical relations pertaining to human rights (and everything I do online I expect to revise, elaborate, re-think, whatever seems apt, given the time to do it).

That provides the first of two background contexts for the road ahead. I hope to render the second one, a sense of mind, by the end of this coming weekend.

Sunday, January 13, 2008

finitude, the gardener


I’m looking at a humongous library of unread tomes (and the publishing world endlessly flowers new titles, of course—wonderful world), so I’m frustrated by the impossibility of absorbing all of it at once (or keeping up with all that draws me).

"The Inner Child and magical thinking echo in ambition," he confessed, as if one might absorb it all before writing further?

"No, I have to write. I have to go on with what I can do," said the poor little dramatist, as if existentialism isn't a tired idiom.

"But the road ahead is so huge that starting anywhere feels almost arbitrary."

One “awaiting” title, The Unfinished Project: Toward a Postmetaphysical Humanism, could be his address.

"Starting at all seems emblematic of pathetic finitude," expressing a life so lacking in free time for reading—because we make our choices. "And I’ve made mine, conscientiously, yet fatefully."

One lives for a well-being that’s worth the limited time one has for making a life (or: one should).

"I have. But I wish I were better at getting more done, faster than I can."

Who doesn't.

Friday, January 11, 2008

"Someday, you're gonna miss me, honey."


I raise a question of "Philosophy" in preface to a circumspective approach to asking: Why care about the basis of mind in nature when so much of humanity is struggling to stay alive?

(My subject line today quotes a line from a song quoted in Sartre's Nausea. I don't know why this popped into my head for this note, though I remember my depth of feeling for that novel when I read it decades ago—I cried near the ending! I can't remember why. Such is youth's doors of perception.)